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Stilts House / Natura Futura Arquitectura

Di, 10.07.2018 - 23:00
© JAG Studio
  • Architects: Natura Futura Arquitectura
  • Location: Playas, Ecuador
  • Design Team: Guillermo Morales, Nathaly Gaona, Ramón Vivanco
  • Area: 160.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2018
  • Photographs: JAG Studio
© JAG Studio

Text description provided by the architects. An architecture that re-appropriates the idea of traditional and flexible as a way of dwelling in the city.

© JAG Studio

The project was to capture the essence of the environment, the lifestyle.

© JAG Studio Plans © JAG Studio

Stilts House, located in Villamil, Guayas province, Ecuador, a satellite city of Guayaquil with a population of 33.560 inhabitants, where at the time of the colony was a port of fishermen settled on ancient indigenous populations while maintaining the tradition today, in 1982 the UNESCO declared General Villamil Beaches as the second best climate in the world after a mountainous place in Australia, it is also known for its great work of local labor craft.

Collage

It is proposed in its composite surround this with baked bricks that are also a traditional material in the local area, with some of the main objectives, do not use glass in their windows, incorporating traditional elements such as chazas, where it allows ventilation and the shadow that are necessary for the tropical climate of the place.

© JAG Studio

It occurs in a horizontal plane high; lightened by a system of pillars of teak which serves to support the breadwinner walls and cover, leaving it to the naked on the volume of " private"  aiming to develop through a proprietary architecture of the tropics, a proposal that meets the needs of the client; on the ground floor, and integrated with the outside and their day-to-day activities, there is a social area that closes in on itself, and opens toward the interior of the house as a rest area with hammocks. This will generate micro-climates, through the material and its new features.

© JAG Studio

It is suggested with the material, the architectural program of project, highlighted with different logics of implementation of brick to provide privacy and permeability.

© JAG Studio

Define a response of urban housing that through different strategies such as the application of principles of sustainable design, are still in the process of searching for ways to question the possibility of having a solution of city closest to reality, to our traditions and the optimization of resources.

© JAG Studio
Kategorien: Architektur

Stilts House / Natura Futura Arquitectura

Di, 10.07.2018 - 23:00
© JAG Studio
  • Architects: Natura Futura Arquitectura
  • Location: Playas, Ecuador
  • Design Team: Guillermo Morales, Nathaly Gaona, Ramón Vivanco
  • Area: 160.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2018
  • Photographs: JAG Studio
© JAG Studio

Text description provided by the architects. An architecture that re-appropriates the idea of traditional and flexible as a way of dwelling in the city.

© JAG Studio

The project was to capture the essence of the environment, the lifestyle.

© JAG Studio Plans © JAG Studio

Stilts House, located in Villamil, Guayas province, Ecuador, a satellite city of Guayaquil with a population of 33.560 inhabitants, where at the time of the colony was a port of fishermen settled on ancient indigenous populations while maintaining the tradition today, in 1982 the UNESCO declared General Villamil Beaches as the second best climate in the world after a mountainous place in Australia, it is also known for its great work of local labor craft.

Collage

It is proposed in its composite surround this with baked bricks that are also a traditional material in the local area, with some of the main objectives, do not use glass in their windows, incorporating traditional elements such as chazas, where it allows ventilation and the shadow that are necessary for the tropical climate of the place.

© JAG Studio

It occurs in a horizontal plane high; lightened by a system of pillars of teak which serves to support the breadwinner walls and cover, leaving it to the naked on the volume of " private"  aiming to develop through a proprietary architecture of the tropics, a proposal that meets the needs of the client; on the ground floor, and integrated with the outside and their day-to-day activities, there is a social area that closes in on itself, and opens toward the interior of the house as a rest area with hammocks. This will generate micro-climates, through the material and its new features.

© JAG Studio

It is suggested with the material, the architectural program of project, highlighted with different logics of implementation of brick to provide privacy and permeability.

© JAG Studio

Define a response of urban housing that through different strategies such as the application of principles of sustainable design, are still in the process of searching for ways to question the possibility of having a solution of city closest to reality, to our traditions and the optimization of resources.

© JAG Studio
Kategorien: Architektur

Seaforth House / MASQ architecture

Di, 10.07.2018 - 22:00
© Ben Guthrie
  • Architects: MASQ architecture
  • Location: Seaforth, Australia
  • Lead Architects: Ted Quinton, Alan Smuskowitz
  • Area: 340.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2017
  • Photographs: Ben Guthrie
© Ben Guthrie

Text description provided by the architects. Sitting on the escarpment at Seaforth the site is blessed with spectacular south facing views down to the Spit. Central to the idea of the project is how the natural environment can be extended and form an integral part of the house. The green escarpment is carried through the front garden and the path to the entry slowly transforms from natural to more formed and solid as the approach continues. Ultimately with the garden mature the building will appear to be completely part of the surrounding landscape; a monolithic form rising out of a green base.

© Ben Guthrie

The house is conceived of as two distinct pavilions; a public wing with the living spaces and a private wing containing bedrooms and ancillary spaces.

Ground floor plan © Ben Guthrie First floor plan

The living areas open both to the front and rear gardens. The roof kicks up to the west allowing a large north window to occupy the highest section providing north sun and light into a south orientated living room. The kitchen tucks onto the back of the space opening to the rear patio and external living areas. The private wing is L-shaped in plan with bedrooms at the upper level. The layout allows for a large undercover outdoor area that wraps around a ground level courtyard. A small strip of landscape allows the rear garden to flow into the courtyard, thereby continuing the idea of the natural environment being as much a part of the house as possible.

© Ben Guthrie

The material palette is deliberately restrained with the use of concrete blocks, off form concrete and timber cladding for the upper level. The house is solid at its base and becomes lighter above the ground floor datum. The house is earthed and feels connected to the ground with both the concrete blocks and timber cladding brought internally to reinforce this notion.

© Ben Guthrie
Kategorien: Architektur

Kutscherhaus / smartvoll

Mo, 09.07.2018 - 08:00
© Dimitar Gamizov
  • Architects: smartvoll
  • Location: Vienna, Austria
  • Lead Architects: Philipp Buxbaum, Christian Kircher
  • Area: 35.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2017
  • Photographs: Dimitar Gamizov
Before © Dimitar Gamizov

Text description provided by the architects. In a single enchated courtyard right behind the Museumsquartier (English: museum´s accommodation) we have resuscitated a small, romantic house of a coachman. Back then the coachman had to divide his small living area with the animal’s food chamber and his own space was also split up corresponding to the different functions of eating, sleeping, washing and living, so it was divided into smaller rooms again. One hundred years later we combine eating, sleeping and living in one central island of living. The bathroom, the kitchen and the storage are placed in a double function wall and are kept to a minimum.

© Dimitar Gamizov Floor plans © Dimitar Gamizov

The result is: A small surface can get a huge room! Outside we put a small terrace on the top of the house and keep this in an elegant dress of fins. The resulting room outside doubles the 35m2 one-room-apartment and let the flat be an introverted refugium. The lamellae keep away snoopy looks from outside and tries to orientate the outside-room to the inside, they nuzzle and hug the spiral stairs that are also the beginning of the rooftop terrace. There you can enjoy an unforgettable view to the unmatched museums – old ones and new ones.

© Dimitar Gamizov © Dimitar Gamizov
Kategorien: Architektur

LiYu / CYS.ASDO

Fr, 29.06.2018 - 22:00
© K. M. Lee
  • Architects: CYS.ASDO
  • Lead Architect: Chung-Yei Sheng
  • Other Participants: Jill Yang, Orange Kang, Peggy Chiang
  • Area: 500.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2016
  • Photographs: K. M. Lee
© K. M. Lee

Text description provided by the architects. LiYu Reception center, located at a scenic yet busy conjunction of multiple thoroughfares, sits next to a famous tourist site’s parking lot. This rare open space, often packed with people and buses, presents a unique challenge to the design team. A friendly approach with an indefinite property line is implemented to embrace the surrounding elements and ease the backdrop into the core design theme.

Plan

We choose a half oval-shaped structure to establish an open curb appeal. This is to facilitate a smooth connection to the surroundings as well as an invitation to passersby. It also makes the adjacent parking lot a viable extension to the center.

© K. M. Lee

It is the designer’s intent to dissect a large volume into various spatial compartments. Not only this allows a diverse design application, it also provides opportunities to a more enriched experience for visitors.

© K. M. Lee

The center’s interior contains spaces for project models, building engineering, VIP conference, offices, model home, and a gourmet kitchen. Various ceiling heights, ceiling mirrors and thoughtful placements of skylights and large windows give each space a solitary feel and effect. The glass-walled model room is definitely a conversation striker as it is a perfect showcase from every directions, inside and outside.

Section

Since the theme for HomeLiving LiYu is “balanced health & happiness”, adding a complete functional kitchen only makes perfect sense. With food-inspired decorations and spacious classroom-size setups, cooking lessons are held here from time to time for pure enjoyment. It surely enhances the center’s HomeLiving appeal and creates a dose of happiness to an ordinary sales center.

© K. M. Lee
Kategorien: Architektur

Brisbane Studio / Cox Architecture

Fr, 29.06.2018 - 20:00
© Christopher Frederick Jones © Christopher Frederick Jones

Text description provided by the architects. Cox Architecture have sensitively restored their heritage Brisbane studio, resulting in a modern creative workplace full of natural light. The foremost challenge was to design a space to suit both the way Cox work now and how the practice wants to work in the future. Secondly, Cox wanted to apply their wider philosophies about society, community, buildings, space, and materials to their own domain.

© Christopher Frederick Jones

The refurbishment of the studio has taken Cox Architecture on a journey of exploration and discovery within a space they thought they knew well, having been residents of the building since 1998. Old Mineral House, originally built in 1890 is one of the few remaining Victorian buildings in Brisbane, serving as a rare architectural reminder of Brisbane’s industrial heritage. Its former beauty, only hinted at through the remaining original cornices and other detail, was buried under layers of partitions, carpets, paint and false ceilings, a result of decades of piecemeal conversions.

© Christopher Frederick Jones Plan and Elevations © Christopher Frederick Jones

Significant elements of the building’s construction have been hidden for some time. Internally the building's structure is predominantly intact. Cox Architecture was delighted to discover and preserve the original timber fish-bone structure and a series of cast iron columns. Stripping the brickwork exposed a remarkable patina of color and texture that tells an evocative story of the building’s history, which is kept on-show as Cox add new pages to the story of Old Mineral House.

© Christopher Frederick Jones

Cox Architecture applied a democratic and open approach to planning the studio, recognizing the dual needs of fluidity and collaboration within the practice. The building is positioned next to the Botanical gardens and the Brisbane River, and Cox has celebrated this proximity by providing uninterrupted views across the studio and through the heritage windows. The open kitchen, which serves dually as an informal gathering space and as a welcome space for clients, overlooks the most favorable aspect so everyone can appreciate the beauty of the prime location.

Front Elevation

A 7m long dining table encourages a convivial atmosphere and provides an understated and family-like approach hospitality. The kitchen connects with the boardroom through a series of double height, glazed pivot doors, which creates a ‘Town Hall’ for events and staff meetings without isolating the space from the studio. New interventions are purposefully restrained to maintain the buildings’ original proportions and let its heritage be the hero.

© Christopher Frederick Jones

A joinery spine that also serves as a design review space extends the length of the studio, connecting the practice through a collaborative and transparent approach to the creative process, inviting all to participate. The spine is bordered by co-working and break-out settings, including a Virtual Reality space, team tables and model making workshop. The new palette of black timber, steel, and brass detailing draws from the building's origins as a warehouse for the neighboring Smellie & Co foundry, as well as from the original and signature cast iron columns.

© Christopher Frederick Jones

The overall effect is both respectful and transformative and elevates both the functional performance and the brand experience of the design studio. Cox Architecture say adding their own contemporary layer to the building has been a fulfilling collaboration. The practice has worked with local craftspeople to create an appropriate interior for such a unique building, providing for the future needs of a thoroughly contemporary practice.

© Christopher Frederick Jones
Kategorien: Architektur

Olson Kundig Chosen To Design The Bob Dylan Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma

Fr, 29.06.2018 - 19:00
Courtesy of Olson Kundig

With construction underway on their renovation of the Space NeedleOlson Kundig will shift their focus to a different American icon. The Seattle firm has unveiled their proposal as lead architect and exhibit designer for The Bob Dylan Center—a new museum that will also house the Bob Dylan Archive in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Sponsored by the George Kaiser Family Foundation and the University of Tulsa, the center is expected to open in 2021, with groundbreaking planned for 2019 in the Tulsa Arts District.

Courtesy of Olson Kundig

Acquired by the Foundation and University in 2016, the Bob Dylan Archive contains over 100,000 artifacts from every era of the folk legend’s career. When the Bob Dylan Center is completed, the collection will curate exhibitions that include unreleased recordings from both live concerts and studio sessions, Bob’s handwritten notebooks and manuscripts, musical instruments, artwork, photographs, films and more. The collection will also be available for scholarly research, making it particularly accessible for Tulsa University’s Institute for Bob Dylan Studies.

Olson Kundig’s building will be close neighbors with The Woody Guthrie Center, a similar research center and museum dedicated to one of Bob Dylan’s great influences and musical heroes. Guthrie was born about 60 miles from Tulsa, and much of his music dealt with his Okie identity and migration to California during the Dust Bowl. The Woody Guthrie Center opened in 2013 after the George Kaiser Family Foundation and Tulsa University acquired the Woody Guthrie Archive.

Courtesy of Olson Kundig

The Tulsa-based firm Lilly Architects will partner with Olson Kundig on their design, and Seattle’s Plains of Yonder will contribute to the audio and multimedia experiences in the exhibits. “This is a deeply meaningful project for us,” said firm principal Tom Kundig, “not only acting as architectural support to Bob’s transformational legacy and creative, disciplined force but also in preserving the teaching value of his legacy for future generations.”

© John Cohen

Originally a native of Minnesota, Dylan was enthusiastic to be included in Tulsa’s art and museum community alongside his musical inspiration and the nearby Gilcrease Museum’s extensive collection of Native American art. “I’m glad that my archives, which have been collected all these years, have finally found a home and are to be included with the works of Woody Guthrie and especially alongside all the valuable artifacts from the Native American Nations. To me, it makes a lot of sense and it’s a great honor."

News via: Olson Kundig

Kategorien: Architektur

Quinta das Paineiras House / Ricardo Ropelle Felippi Arquiteto

Fr, 29.06.2018 - 18:00
© Priscilla Paggiaro
  • Structural Engineer: Rubens de Oliveira
  • Electrical And Hydraulic Systems Engineer: Mega Watts Projetos Elétricos e Hidráulicos - Daniel Bissoli
© Priscilla Paggiaro

Text description provided by the architects. The house was designed on a land with prime location within the allotment. The lack of neighbors on their sides facing the street allowed generous openings without loss of privacy and incorporating to the internal environment the natural light and the sky with its transformations.

© Priscilla Paggiaro

The project proposes two blocks with different uses and forms to clearly separate two programmatic concepts of living: socialization and recollection.

Plan

Socialization is experienced in the "open house". Fully integrated with the garden and the landscape, it proposes a new form of relationship between people, landscape and place. In this part of the house are located the living areas, cooking, socializing and entertainment.

© Priscilla Paggiaro

Large sliding doors along the main space bathe the interior with natural light and allow the garden and the sky to be part of the internal environment, accentuating the connection between the internal and external spaces, without limitations to the circulation between these spaces.

© Priscilla Paggiaro

The gathering happens in the "closed box", designed for the protection of individuality. With its back to the social areas, the atmosphere is suitable for both rest and reflection. A place to take care of body and soul.

© Priscilla Paggiaro

In this block, which floats on the garden, are located the bedrooms. Its windows facing east and the forest allow us to witness the sunrise and enjoy the silence of nature.

Sketch Section

The volume of the dorms is supported by two elements with opposite characteristics. On one side the heaviness of a stone block, where the office is located and on the other the lightness of the unfilled garage with a garden in the background. 

© Priscilla Paggiaro

The concept of landscaping was the expansion in the variety and freedom of use in social areas. The lawn is proposed as an extension of the indoor areas and pool terrace. For privacy, tall species have been placed along the boundaries of the land and a hedge replaces the traditional closing walls. 

© Priscilla Paggiaro

Walking around the house is an experience to feel different atmospheres, textures, sensations, sounds and visuals.

Kategorien: Architektur

ALA Architects' Central Library Oodi and JKMM's Amos Anderson Art Museum Near Completion in Helsinki

Fr, 29.06.2018 - 17:00
The Helsinki Central Library Oodi. Image Courtesy of ALA Architects

The Helsinki Central Library Oodi, designed by ALA Architects, is nearing completion in Finland. Due to open its doors on December 3rd 2018, the library is situated in the cultural district of Töölönlahti, where it will sit as a ”powerful and iconic temporary design” among other architectural landmarks.

Situated across from the Finnish Parliament House, the scheme represents an interaction between the state and its citizens, “a new avenue to promote freedom of speech and democracy.”

The Helsinki Central Library Oodi. Image Courtesy of ALA Architects The Helsinki Central Library Oodi. Image Courtesy of ALA Architects

Oodi is intended to serve as both a traditional library for 100,000 books, and a promoter of digital culture. Arranged over three levels, the top floor is dedicated to traditional library functions through an adaptable space with glass walls, a wide balcony, and sweeping city views. The middle floor is dedicated to “learning by doing” with urban workshops and digital studios, while the ground floor serves as an extension to a public plaza complete with a multipurpose hall for exhibitions, cafes, and a cinema.

The Helsinki Central Library Oodi. Image Courtesy of ALA Architects The Helsinki Central Library Oodi. Image Courtesy of ALA Architects

Having been designed by ALA Architects following a 544-proposal design competition in 2013, the soon-to-open library is expected to host 10,000 daily visitors, totaling 2.5 million annually.

Before the Oodi opens, Helsinki will play host to the opening of the nearby Amos Anderson Art Museum on August 30th, designed by JKMM Architects. Situated underneath the square of the museum’s 1936 Lasipalatsi building, the scheme will feature structural dome ceilings, and skylights to form a connection between the exhibition hall and square.

Amos Anderson Art Museum. Image Courtesy of JKMM Architects Amos Anderson Art Museum. Image Courtesy of JKMM Architects

News via: City of Helsinki

Kategorien: Architektur

Family Residence / Tempesta Tramparulo

Mo, 25.06.2018 - 12:00
© Milo Keller
  • Architects: Tempesta Tramparulo
  • Location: Grimisuat, Switzerland
  • Lead Architects: Maurizio Tempesta
  • Area: 269.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2017
  • Photographs: Milo Keller
© Milo Keller

Text description provided by the architects. In the 18th century, a new relationship came about between human society and its environment. The Romantic spirit looked to the mountains to find the sublime, an idea that Jean-François Lyotard defined in his 1984 work The Sublime and the Avant-Garde as “that contradictory feeling - pleasure and pain, joy and anxiety, exaltation and depression”. These words resonate in one’s experience of the site chosen for this family home. The beauty of the view is breath-taking, and the building’s orientation is perfect. Yet its surroundings are marked by the sprawl of buildings typical of many neighbourhoods developing in communes like Grimisuat, close to the well-conserved natural landscapes found at ever-higher altitudes as well as the built infrastructure of the Rhône valley.

© Milo Keller Plan © Milo Keller

To reconcile these contrasting impressions, the project has been finely crafted to create a frame for its inhabitants that magnifies the positives of the site, and eclipses the negatives. Contrary to what one might expect, this outcome has not been achieved by putting the family’s interests above all other considerations. Instead of copying the profile of several neighbouring buildings, with multiple storeys rising from a base to break the line of the mountain slope, the building extends along one level. This arrangement of rooms allows it to extend diagonally with a plan adapted to its topography, while also respecting the overall profile of buildings in the neighbourhood. Instead of competing in height, in an attempt to secure exceptional views, the quality of this project lies in the precision with which the placement of openings establishes a relationship between the exterior and the interior. While the apparent modesty of the house may suggest that it is less comfortable than its neighbours, it in fact offers an uncommon richness of orientations and ambiances, all at minimal cost to its human and environmental context.

© Milo Keller

The manner in which the slope of the terrain has been interpreted establishes a dialogue between what is near and what is far away. To the North, openings look onto the slope, which acts as a nearby visual screen due to its verticality. The exterior space plays a role much like that of a patio, bringing in light at the same time as it fosters a feeling of protection. Opposite, facing South, one’s view is drawn to an impressive panorama, which is further enhanced by thoughtful framing. Adding to these qualities are the East and West-facing openings, which allow for an interplay of sunlight to animate the space throughout the day. In addition, mobile elements on the façade allow the residents to modulate the light and views at all times.

© Milo Keller

The use of timber throughout serves to express subtle transitions between scales, contrasting the large and the small, the landscaping surrounding the building, and the monumentality of the Alps. From afar, the house looks old and vernacular, governed by the constraints of an architecture formed and refined by the harshness of mountain life. On the approach, however, the motif of the cladding becomes visible, revealing a building that combines the power of inherited traditions with a project aimed at meeting higher needs. This is achieved through the creation of a living environment that does justice to an exceptional situation. In the interior, the degree of craftsmanship reaches a new threshold, culminating in the attention lavished on the sitting room library.

Detail

In this room, the frank juxtaposition of a book collection with the view outside challenges the supposed dichotomy between nature and culture, implying that the coming together of opposites can be a prompt to dialogue. There could be no better summary of the spirit of this project.

© Milo Keller
Kategorien: Architektur

What is the American Dream Home in 2018?

Mo, 25.06.2018 - 11:00
© <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Markham-suburbs_aerial-edit2.jpg'>Wikimedia user Sting</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5/'>CC BY-SA 2.5</a>

A recent survey done by Chicago-based digital marketing firm Digital Third Coast asked 2,000 current or prospective homeowners for their feedback on their realistic dream house, along with their opinions on homeownership in general. Commissioned by an Illinois fireplace company, Northshore Fireplace, the survey presented respondents with a list of multiple choice questions, as well as open response questions to come up with an in-depth analysis of the 'American Dream Home of 2018.' The survey was done via the Amazon Mechanical Turk platform and included people from all across the country and different age groups. The main qualifying criteria for respondents was that they either owned a home currently or were looking to purchase a new home within the next 5 years.

Findings from the survey include ideal exterior and interior styles, most desired luxury, most popular words used to describe a dream home, average square footage, and much more. Based on the survey data, you can even compare design and finance ideas of GenX and Millenial homeowners to that of the Baby Boomers generation.

Read on for the detailed infographic that displays the resulting criteria for the 'American Dream Home of 2018.'

News via: Builder

Kategorien: Architektur

Early Call for Entries: A' Design Awards & Competition 2018-2019

Mo, 25.06.2018 - 10:30
Courtesy of A' Design Award

The A’ Design Award was "born out of the desire to underline the best designs and well-designed products." It is an international award whose aim is to provide designers, architects, and innovators from all design fields with a platform to showcase their work and products to a global audience. This year's edition is now open for entries; designers can register their submissions here.

While there is no shortage of design awards out there, the A' Design Award stands out for its exceptional scale; with over 100 design categories. Alongside a category for Architecture, Building and Structure Design, the award features a number of categories that may be beneficial to those in the world of architecture—including categories for Good Industrial Design, Good Architecture DesignGood Product Design, and Good Communication Design. You can see all of the categories on their website here.

Winners of an A' Design Award receive a trophy alongside a host of other benefits: a certificate, inclusion in an exhibition, inclusion in a yearbook publication, winners' badges, an exclusive interview to be featured on the A' Design Awards website, inclusion in the world design rankings, an invite to a gala night hosted by the awards for networking, feedback notes from the award jury, and participation in an extensive PR campaign are all offered to winners among other benefits. Click here to see the full list of benefits.

Entries will be judged by A' Design Award's jury of hundreds of experts from around the globe including scholars, professionals and media members. Each jury members is required to sign a jury agreement and follow a code of conduct. In addition, jurors may not be employees of the participating companies to avoid conflicts of interest. This jury process has been designed to lead to a more fair and equitable awards process, with no single juror exercising undue influence on the results of the awards. You can find out more about the jury and its process here.

The submission period for the A' Design Award closes on June 30th. You can submit your designs here, or find out more about the awards in multiple languages here. After the winners are announced on April 15th, a selection of architecture-related winners will be featured in a post on ArchDaily. See a selection of winners from previous years below.

Malangen Retreat Family retreat / Snorre Stinessen

Platinum A' Architecture, Building and Structure Design Award in 2018

Courtesy of A' Design Award

One Main / Raphael Crespin

Platinum A' Architecture, Building and Structure Design Award in 2016

Courtesy of A' Design Award

Black Eagle / Perathoner Architects

Platinum A' Architecture, Building and Structure Design Award in 2017

Courtesy of A' Design Award

The Cutting Edge / Tetsuya Matsumoto

Platinum A' Architecture, Building and Structure Design Award in 2017

Courtesy of A' Design Award

Grotto Sauna / PARTISANS

Platinum A' Architecture, Building and Structure Design Award in 2015

Courtesy of A' Design Award

Life Extension / YU,PIN-CHI

Platinum A' Interior Space, Retail and Exhibition Design Award in 2018

Courtesy of A' Design Award

Brickkiln Folk Inn and Museum / Kevin Hu

Platinum A' Interior Space, Retail and Exhibition Design Award in 2018

Courtesy of A' Design Award

G Space by Ming Hong-Tsai

Platinum A' Interior Space, Retail and Exhibition Design Award in 2018

Courtesy of A' Design Award

Da Chang Muslim Cultural Center / Hejingtang Design Studio

Platinum A' Architecture, Building and Structure Design Award in 2018

Courtesy of A' Design Award

Skynet by Kris Lin

Platinum A' Interior Space, Retail and Exhibition Design Award in 2017

Courtesy of A' Design Award

 Useful links:

Check out the A’ Design Award Presentation: http://www.designaward.com
In-depth Presentation of A’ Design Accolades: http://www.whatisadesignaward.com
Enter your works to the A’ Design competition: http://www.adesignaward.com/registration.php
Instructions for submission: http://www.adesignaward.com/entryinstructions.html
Browse award-winning designs: http://www.awardeddesigns.com
Read Interviews with Award Winning Designers: http://www.design-interviews.com
Discover World Design Rankings: http://www.worlddesignrankings.com

We will publish a selection of winners on April 15 at ArchDaily. Register your works here: https://competition.adesignaward.com/registration.php

Kategorien: Architektur

Hidden Architectural Gems to Visit this Summer

Mo, 25.06.2018 - 09:00
Rachid Karameh Exhibition. Image © Anthony Saroufim

Summer. Vacation. Two magic words that will certainly ease all the pain and exhaustion of working/studying full-time. Now that it is that time of year, most people are busy planning their travel itineraries. Whether it’s a city trip to Paris to see the Eiffel Tower and the Louvre, or a journey to walk on China’s Great Wall, the majority of travelers will choose to cross iconic landmarks off their bucket lists. However, there is a lot more to London than the London Bridge and Buckingham Palace, and there is a lot more to Barcelona than Gaudí. There are, in fact, hundreds of underrated, exquisite structures that go unnoticed.

If you are planning a getaway soon, here is a list of hidden architectural gems that are worth the visit.

The Abbey of San Galgano, Florence, Italy

Abbey of San Galgano. Image Courtesy of Wikimedia user MAX PIXEK licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

If you’re planning to visit the picturesque Tuscan countryside, the Abbey of San Galgano is situated in the valley of river Merse, in the province of Siena. The Italian-Gothic style church was built in the 13th century and still stands today, but without a roof. The monastery is open to the public for a 3€ entrance fee.

The Church of the Holy Redeemer, Ani, Turkey / Armenia Border

The Church of the Holy Redeemer. Image Courtesy of Wikimedia User Ggia licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

Ani is a medieval town located in the Turkish province Kars, near the Armenian border. The town, which is known as the “abandoned city of ghosts”, was once an Armenian city, and holds a collection of ruined churches, mosques, and walls. The church of the Holy Redeemer was completed in the 11th century and remained intact until the 20th century. In 1955, a large storm hit the city, collapsing the entire eastern half of the church.

The Abandoned Model Prison (Presidio Modelo), Nueva Gerona, Cuba

The Model Prison. Image © Tod Seelie

After years of restricting tourism, Cuba has finally allowed foreigners to visit and experience its unique and complex culture. Located on Cuba’s La Isla de la Juventud, or “the Isle of Youth”, this unusual and historic prison is now a national monument for visitors from all around the globe. The Presidio Modelo, which once housed Fidel Castro, was inspired by “the idea that inmates are under constant surveillance, or at least are never able to know when they are being watched”, an ideology derived from English philosopher Jeremy Bentham in the late 18th century. The island is reachable either by domestic flights or ferry services (the transportation services are infrequent, so make sure you look into the schedules ahead of time).

The Traboules of Lyon, Lyon, France

The Traboules of Lyon. Image Courtesy of Wikimedia User Phinou licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

If you are visiting France soon, make sure you visit the country’s second largest city (a 2.5-hour train ride from Paris). Lyon hides hundreds of passages, staircases, and alleyways, tucked through buildings and courtyards. The locally-famous Traboules in Lyon were built in the 4th century and were used by merchants to transport their products.  Most of the Traboules are now touristic sites and open to the public.

Ancient Spanish Monastery, Miami, Florida, USA

The Spanish Monastery. Image Courtesy of Wikimedia User Daderot licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

Although Miami is notorious for its sunny beaches and lively parties, the city is home to a few historic monuments. The St. Bernard de Clairvaux Church is a medieval Spanish monastery, located on the North Miami Beach. The church, which was built in Sacramenia, Spain in the 12th century, was dismantled and relocated to New York in the 20th century. It was eventually relocated again to its current location and is considered the oldest European-built structure in the Western Hemisphere.

<h2">Woolwich Town Hall, London, UK

Woolwich Town Hall. Image © Marathon

The Woolwich Town Hall was completed in 1906 with an Edwardian Baroque-style exterior, but it is gaining momentum due to its picturesque interior. After several wedding photographs taken inside the hall were posted on social media, the eccentric hall became a hot-spot for Instagram and Pinterest accounts.

Sketch, Mayfair, London, UK

Sketch London. Image Courtesy of Sketch London

If you’re looking for a fairy-tale, out-of-this-world interior with a Michelin-star cuisine, Sketch is the place to visit. A destination place for art, food, and music combined, Sketch is quite the unique experience in London, UK. The center is a newly renovated 18th-century building in Conduit Street, Mayfair, and has one of the most vibrant and expressive interiors in the country. Ever since its opening, the center has gained massive social media attention, forcing it to be fully-booked months ahead.

La Fabrica, Sant Just Desvern, Barcelona, Spain

La Fabrica. Image Courtesy of Ricardo Bofill

Barcelona is one of the most visited cities in the world and is home to some of the most iconic architectural landmarks. A 30-minute drive from the city center leads you to one of the most famous adaptive-reuse projects to date. La Fabrica, also known as “The Factory”, is a cement-factory-turned-residence/office by Ricardo Bofill. In 1973, the architect found the disused cement factory, consisting of over 30 silos, subterranean galleries and huge machine rooms, and decided to transform it into the head office of Taller de Arquitectura.

Walden 7, Sant Just Desvern, Barcelona, Spain

Walden 7. Image Courtesy of Ricardo Bofill

After you’ve visited La Fabrica, head towards Bofill’s Walden 7 complex, located in the same lot as the renovated structure. The housing structure benefits from Bofill's earlier research into providing public spaces and gardens for residents to enjoy an enhanced quality of living. The facade is completely painted in red, while the courtyards have a lively treatment of intense blue, violet and yellow. The most interesting aspect of the project is the atypical way in which the housing block is designed, consisting of an unsystematic, dynamic grid.

Royal Mansour Hotel Spa, Marrakech, Morocco

Royal Mansour Spa. Image Courtesy of Royal Mansour Hotel Management

Morocco has been recently named as one of the must-see countries for tourism. The Arabian country is known for its Islamic / Moorish design patterns and saturated color palettes while maintaining a cultural influence from European and African countries. The Royal Mansour Hotel and Spa is a well-known, luxurious hotel in Marrakech, with a striking interior. The hotel’s interior design is a rendition of traditional Moroccan architecture, but the interior design of the Spa takes a different direction. The entirely-white space is a modernized vision of traditional Islamic designs, with large geometric cutouts acting as partitions and walls.

Kelburn Castle, Largs, Scotland, UK

Kelburn Castle. Image Courtesy of Wikimedia User CoburnProjects licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

If you plan on seeing historic castles and fairy-tale chateaus, Scotland is the country to visit. The country possesses thousands of castles that date back to the 11th century, with classic structures and vast courtyards. One castle, however, got quite the modern makeover. Almost a decade ago, the owners of the Kelburn Castle were informed that the facade needed renovation to avoid potential damage. Lord Glasgow, the owner of the castle, took his children’s advice and invited Brazilian artists to paint the walls. The project, which is currently under works of becoming a permanent feature, was featured on BBC’s The Culture Show.

Liquidrom, Berlin, Germany

Liquidrom. Image Courtesy of Liquidrom

Site-seeing can be hectic, and what better way to relax than spend a day at the spa. Some spas, however, are a site of their own, transferring their visitors into another dimension. Liquidrom is a surreal spa that looks like it came out of a sci-fi movie. The exterior is an angular crown-like white structure, while the interior is a multi-colored, dimly-lit pool surrounded by large arches. The pool’s techno experience is enhanced by the programmed light and music, which can be heard underwater.

Schwerbelastungskörper, Berlin, Germany

Schwerbelastungskörper. Image Courtesy of Wikimedia user Sekamor licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

The Schwerbelastungskörper, which literally translates to “heavy load-bearing body” is bulky concrete cylinder in Berlin, Germany. Although the building is not considered aesthetically pleasing, the history behind the structure, as well as its interior, give the building its value. The structure was designed by Hitler’s chief architect, Albert Speer as a study model. Speer wanted to study whether the city’s ground could carry a large heavy structure, to be able to build a large triumphal arch later on. The plan was to cover the cylinder with an artificial hill and erect the triumphal arch on top, but the work was halted due to World War II. After the war, removing the bulky cylinder was only possible through explosives, which was impossible due to the surrounding buildings and train tracks. The structure was left to become a historic monument, open to all visitors.

Iglesia El Rosario, San Salvador, El Salvador

Iglesia El Rosario. Image Courtesy of Wikimedia user Jose Quintanilla licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

South America has some of the world’s largest and finest religious monuments. If you happen to be visiting San Salvador soon, you will probably notice a large semi-circle concrete structure. If you are without a tour guide, you might think that the building is perhaps a theatre, or cultural center, when in fact, it is Rubén Martínez Bulnes’ controversial, unconventional modern church. El Rosario is the city’s first ever cathedral and the architect made sure that the design is unique, but provides the same spiritual experience just as any other religious building. From the structure to the plan, and all the way to the colorful stained glass and lighting, the El Rosario is definitely a unique sight.

Rachid Karameh Exhibition Center, Tripoli, Lebanon

Rachid Karameh Exhibition. Image © Anthony Saroufim

Frequent political conflicts and neighboring wars did not stop Lebanon from being a tourism destination. The culturally-rich country is a perfect blend of past and present and is home to several famous buildings. One of the best reasons to visit Lebanon is the fact that it is a small country, which means that going from one city to another is not time-consuming. Tripoli, Lebanon’s northern city and second largest city in the country, lies only 1.5 hours away from Beirut and is home to Oscar Niemeyer’s unfinished exhibition center. One of the five largest exhibition centers in the world, Niemeyer’s project consists of 15 different concrete structures, which were abandoned in 1975 due to civil war.

If you happen to stumble upon interesting hidden architectural gems, make sure to tag @archdaily and use #archdailytravels in your posts.

Kategorien: Architektur

Spotlight: Álvaro Siza

Mo, 25.06.2018 - 08:30
The Building on the Water. Image © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

One of the most highly regarded architects of his generation, Portugese architect Álvaro Siza (born 25 June 1933) is known for his sculptural works that have been described as "poetic modernism." When he was awarded the Pritzker Prize in 1992, Siza was credited as being a successor of early modernists: the jury citation describes how "his shapes, molded by light, have a deceptive simplicity about them; they are honest."

Courtesy of Álvaro Siza

Born in Matosinhos near Porto, as a child Siza wanted to become a sculptor, a predilection that shows itself in his work to this day. However, a trip to Barcelona convinced him to become an architect when he experienced the work of Antoni Gaudí. This sculptural architecture he then knits into its context, connecting his buildings with the site and the culture masterfully.

Leça Swimming Pools. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Swimming_Pool_Piscinas_de_Mar%C3%A9s_Le%C3%A7a_da_Palmeira_by_%C3%81lvaro_Siza_foto_Christian_G%C3%A4nshirt.jpg'>Wikimedia user Christian Gänshirt</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 4.0</a>

A well-known quote by Siza asserts that "architects don't invent anything, they just transform reality," and this might explain the logic behind Siza's restrained style. His work builds on the established models of the Modernists who held sway at the start of his career—and even while the reputation of Modernism has risen and fallen in the years since, Siza has remained largely unaffected by the experimental and transitory movements of the period, instead preferring to subtly, gradually transform his style over the decades.

Expo'98 Portuguese National Pavilion. Image © Flickr user Pedro Moura Pinheiro

Siza first gained recognition in the 1960s with his Leça Swimming Pools and his Boa Nova Tea House, and has remained hugely influential ever since: among his most respected works is his gravity-defying Portuguese National Pavilion for the 1998 Expo; his Fundação Iberê Camargo was a joint winner of the first ever Mies Crown Hall Americas Prize (MCHAP) in 2014; and at the 2012 Venice Biennale he both completed an exhibition pavilion and was awarded the Golden Lion for lifetime achievement.

Fundação Iberê Camargo. Image © Grazielle Bruscato

See all of Álvaro Siza's Works featured on ArchDaily via the thumbnails below, and more coverage below those:

Álvaro Siza wins Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement

Siza's Iberê Camargo Foundation and Herzog & de Meuron's 1111 Lincoln Road Win Inaugural MCHAP Award

NEIGHBOURHOOD: Where Alvaro Meets Aldo / Inside Portugal's Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale

Interview with Álvaro Siza: "Beauty Is the Peak of Functionality!"

AR Issues: Architects Don't Invent, They Transform

Reflections On Álvaro Siza's Seminal Quinta da Malagueira Housing Scheme

Alturas de Macchu Picchu: Martín Chambi - Álvaro Siza at work

Travel Diary: Álvaro Siza and Carlos Castanheira by Fernando Guerra

Portraits of Álvaro Siza by Fernando Guerra

Video: The Obsolescence of a Building, an Interview with Álvaro Siza

Video: Alvaro Siza Denounces Architecture's "Hyper-Specialization"

Álvaro Siza's Full Personal Archive Released for Free Online Browsing

Boa Nova Tea House by Alvaro Siza Through the Lens of Fernando Guerra

Auditorium Theatre of Llinars del Valles Through the Lens of Fernando Guerra

Nadir Afonso Contemporary Art Museum by Álvaro Siza Opened its Doors in Chaves, Portugal

St. Ovídio Chapel By Álvaro Siza Through The Lens Of Fernando Guerra

Alvaro Siza's New Church of Saint-Jacques de la Lande Through the Lens of Ana Amado

Alvaro Siza's Galician Center of Contemporary Art Through the Lens of Fernando Guerra

Video: Alvaro Siza sings The Beatles

Kategorien: Architektur

Portushome Guesthouse / Barna Architects

Mo, 25.06.2018 - 08:00
© Tamás Bata
  • Architects: Barna Architects
  • Location: Dörgicse, Hungary
  • Lead Architects: Barna D. Kovács
  • Area: 90.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2017
  • Photographs: Tamás Bata
  • Static Engineer: Sándor Styaszny, Dénes Alibán
  • Mechanical Engineer: Géza Porosz
  • Execution Company : Reedzone Ltd.
  • Custumer/Owner : Csaba Antal
© Tamás Bata

Text description provided by the architects. The primary task of the design was to create a guest house that is connected to the local environment, which provides a native atmosphere by making use of  modern architectural elements. The secondary task was to create a space for the terrace that is in connection with the interior and can be one of the main living areas of the house.  The aim of the geometry and  the materials of the building was to connect the design to the site and create a native atmosphere. We planned to use traditional materials with a modern sense of design. The load bearing  structure is visible on the exterior of the building, that provides rhythm and arrangement to the facade system.

© Tamás Bata

The structural elements are enhanced to serve the architectural concept of the house. The pillars of the structure stand in pairs, with a 1.4 meter axis distance to each other. Between the pillars are the transparent doors and windows all along the facade, providing plenty of natural light to the interior, as well as upholding a continuous connection between the inhabitants and nature.

Ground Floor Attic

The wood frame structure is self supporting, the isolation walls are placed behind the pillars. The main building and the terrace reflect the same system of design, with the difference that the isolation walls are not included in the terrace construction.

© Tamás Bata

The main aspect of the design process was to imagine the requested special atmosphere of the building, and at the same time being aware of the strict  local regulations of the Balaton highland area.

Section B1

The leading themes for the concept were: returning into nature, creating a unique native atmosphere with modern elements. The conceptual phase was developed in collaboration with the owner. The common work with the costumer allowed us to flourish the architectural idea and to develop a system that reflects a unique native resonance.  

© Tamás Bata

Some further inspiration of the project was provided by analyzing the architectural archetypes of Balaton Highland, and recognizing the similarity of these forms to Marc-Antoine Laugier's conceptual illustration of the Primitive Hut.    The planned building points out some of the basic elements of architecture: transitional space, covered pathways, the inside and outside, locality, and understanding the relation between nature and man from an aspect of form and construction.    

© Tamás Bata
Kategorien: Architektur

"Mind-Building": The Finnish Pavilion at the 2018 Venice Biennale

Mo, 25.06.2018 - 07:00
© Alexander Mayes and Archinfo Finland

As part of our 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale coverage, we present the completed Finnish Pavilion. To read the initial proposal, refer to our previously published post, "Finnish Pavilion at the 2018 Venice Biennale to Examine the Future of Libraries."

Conceived by Commissioner Hanna Harris, Director of Archinfo Finland, and Curator Dr Anni Vartola, the Finnish Pavilion presents Mind-Building at the 2018 Venice Biennale, an exhibition that explores the importance of the public library in Finnish culture. With exhibition design by Tuomas Siitonen and graphic design by Johannes Nieminen, it showcases Finnish libraries through a thematic selection of architectural designs, objects and specially commissioned sound and video work.

With showcased examples from the Rikhardinkatu public library of 1881 to the upcoming Helsinki Central Library, the exhibition documents the historical and cultural significance of the library as a space for all. It also considers the potential of the library in the 21st century to become a "popular monument," what the curators describe as a "noncommercial, public space which is open for everyone, free for everyone, belonging to everyone and used for everyone’s benefit.”

© Ugo Carmeni and Archinfo Finland © Alexander Mayes and Archinfo Finland © Alexander Mayes and Archinfo Finland © Alexander Mayes and Archinfo Finland © Alexander Mayes and Archinfo Finland
Kategorien: Architektur

Regional House Edeghem / BC architects

Mo, 25.06.2018 - 06:00
Courtesy of BC architects
  • Architects: BC architects
  • Location: 2650 Edegem, Belgium
  • Area: 350.0 m2
  • Project Year: 2015
  • Cooperation: Stramien landscape
  • Client: Edegem
Courtesy of Thomas Noceto

Text description provided by the architects. This project is framed within a wider masterplan for the Fort V site, aiming to strengthen the current function of public park. The 'bioclass' is known to locals, but needs a new infrastructure. It is conceived as a new reception centre for education of nature and ecology for the region.

Courtesy of Thomas Noceto Plan Courtesy of Thomas Noceto

The design interprets the existing warehouse as a Hortus Conclusus, in which the existing walls are considered as garden walls. The warehouse will be opened up in certain area's to allow vegetation to grow in a controlled way. Zones will be installed which house rare plant species, a swamp, or a summer bar reception area. The hall is the first place to start excursions for fauna and flora, which can extend into the park of Fort V.

Courtesy of Thomas Noceto

The Regional House itself reflects this educative and ecological approach through a radically sustainable and participative architecture. Structurally arched walls, inspired by the arch masonry of the fort, are made of compressed earth blocks from local clays. An insulation façade and roof of hempcrete is left apparent as finishing and makes this building CO2-negative. Only two construction techniques make the superstructure of this building honest, minimalistic and educational.

Courtesy of Thomas Noceto Courtesy of BC architects Courtesy of BC architects

19000 blocks were produced in a 3 week workshop, and 312 m2 of hempcrete was installed in a 2 week workshop: together, more than 150 volunteers worked on and learned with this project.

Axonometric
Kategorien: Architektur

Las Bóvedas / - = + x -

Mi, 09.05.2018 - 14:00
© Alejandro Patiño
  • Structural Calculus: Carlos Escobar
  • Structural Advice: Denes Tomboly
© Leonardo Méndez

Text description provided by the architects. The project is set in a semi-rural area, in the limit of Luque and Asuncion, which are part of a cluster of cities called Gran Asuncion. It is near Ñu Guazú park (a green area of 25 ha.) and the airport. It is situated on high territories which allows cool temperatures and more wind breeze than in urban areas.

Cortesía de - = + x -

Both paired houses lie on a 12m x 36m ground, opening all spaces to the east and west orientation.

© Leonardo Méndez Facade Elevation, First floor Plan and Transversal Section © Leonardo Méndez

On the lower stage, service spaces are situated in the front, leaving more open space for the social areas, connecting to a yard, under a brick vaulted roof that unifies all spaces of the house in double height. The warmth of the brick texture is enhanced by a brick sky light that hangs from the vault, and acts as a heat chimney.

© Leonardo Méndez

On the higher floor there are two volumes, one in the front and one in the back, connected by a light bridge in which the bedrooms are placed, leaving a central space in double height.

© Leonardo Méndez

The Project is synthetized by two ceramic vaults on a concrete structure which act as water gutters on the ground limits.

Cortesía de - = + x -
Kategorien: Architektur

Spotlight: Gordon Bunshaft

Mi, 09.05.2018 - 13:30
AD Classics: Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library. Image © <a href='https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beinecke_Rare_Book_%26_Manuscript_Library#/media/File:Beinecke-Rare-Book-Manuscript-Library-Yale-University-Hewitt-Quadrangle-New-Haven-Connecticut-Apr-2014-a.jpg'>Wikimedia Commons user Gunnar Klack</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/'>CC BY-SA 4.0</a>

As lead designer of the Lever House and many of America’s most historically prominent buildings, Pritzker Prize-winning architect Gordon Bunshaft (9 May 1909 – 6 August 1990) is credited with ushering in a new era of Modernist skyscraper design and corporate architecture. A stern figure and a loyal advocate of the International Style, Bunshaft spent the majority of his career as partner and lead designer for SOM, who have referred to him as “a titan of industry, a decisive army general, an architectural John Wayne.”

Gordon Bunshaft outside the Beinecke Rare Book Library. Image Courtesy of SOM / © Alburtus – Yale News Bureau

Born in Buffalo, New York to a Russian Jewish immigrant family, Bunshaft studied architecture at MIT, earning his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in 1933 and 1935, respectively. Upon graduation, he spent two years traveling in Europe through fellowships earned at school, and then moved to New York to work with Edward Durell Stone. After a short stint with Stone, he joined Louis Skidmore of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill to work on projects for the 1939 New York World Fair. After a hiatus to serve in the Army Corps of Engineers during World War II, Bunshaft returned to SOM, where he was named lead designer of the Lever House.

Lever House. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/gaf/15726775064'>Flickr user gaf</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>CC BY-SA 2.0</a>

The Lever House (1952) is noted as one of the first and the most influential of International Style skyscrapers in the United States, featuring a sleek, blue-green glass tower rising from a raised podium, and a roof garden that returned greenery to the dense urban fabric of New York City. After the success of the Lever House, Bunshaft’s designs continued to feature smooth, glass facades, expressed steel structure and corporate clients, such as the Manufacturer's Trust Company Building (1954) and the Chase Manhattan Bank Building (1951), both in New York City.

Manufacturer's Trust Building. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Manufacturers_Trust_Company_Building_510_Fifth_Avenue.jpg'>Wikimedia user Beyond My Ken</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/'>CC BY-SA 4.0</a>

In the early 1960s, Bunshaft started receiving commissions from cultural and educational institutions. His addition to the Albright Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, New York (1961) featured a glassy black box floating over a stone podium, and for the Beinecke Rare Book Library at Yale University (1963), he used thin panels of Vermont marble to allow filtered light to pass into the main space, a large volume housing a mountain of bookstacks. He also designed his own house, called the Travertine House, in the Hamptons in 1962, and the Johnson Presidential Library in 1971.

Beinecke Rare Book Library. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/joevare/5524134719'>Flickr user joevare</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-ND 2.0</a>

In the 1970s, Bunshaft began employing curves in his architecture, such as in the Solow Building and W.R. Grace Building in New York (1974) and the Smithsonian Hirshhorn Museum (1974) in Washington, DC (for which plans for an unusual addition by Diller, Scofidio + Renfro were recently scrapped).

Hirshhorn Museum. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hirshhorn_Museum.jpg'>Wikimedia user postdlf</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>

The final stage of Bunshaft’s career took place in Saudi Arabia, where he designed the 2010 AIA Twenty-five Year Award winning Hajj Terminal at King Abdulaziz Airport in Jeddah (1983), utilizing a grid of tensile tent structures to provide shade both indoors and outdoors to combat the brutally hot climate. Bunshaft’s final project was the National Commercial Bank Headquarters in Jeddah, completed in 1983, that features loggias at three different levels that Bunshaft referred to as “gardens in the air.” Leaving on a high note, Bunshaft claimed, “I think this is one of my best and most unique projects."

Hajj Terminal at King Abdulaziz Airport, Jeddah. Image © SOM - Jay Langlois | Owens-Corning

See some of the work completed by SOM during Gordon Bunshaft's tenure via the thumbnails below, and further coverage below those:

SOM's Iconic 270 Park Avenue At Risk of Becoming the Tallest Building Ever to Be Demolished

Docomomo Pens Letter In Response to the Planned Demolition of New York's Union Carbide Building

Walter Netsch: The "Radical Mind" That Designed SOM's Air Force Academy Chapel

Kategorien: Architektur

ArchDaily's 2018 Refurbishment in Architecture Awards Are Now Open for Nominations

Mi, 09.05.2018 - 13:30

This year, in partnership with MINI Clubman, we are launching a special award that highlights the best refurbishments of buildings and spaces from around the world. 

Alongside MINI, we have decided to promote this category in the belief that one of the most sustainable ways to develop architecture now is through the recovery of existing structures. From urban renovations to new uses for former factories, or even simply giving new life to an old house, refurbishment projects demonstrate the flexibility of our existing cities and the many scales at which old buildings can be repurposed.

As in our Building of the Year Award, we entrust our readers with the responsibility of rewarding the best refurbishment projects in architecture—the designs that have had an impact on our profession. By voting, you are part of an impartial and distributed network of professionals who act as a jury to choose the most relevant works of the last eight years. Over the next 3 weeks, the collective intelligence of our audience will filter more than 450 projects to select 3 winners representing the best of architecture refurbishment published on ArchDaily.

This is your chance to reward the architecture you love—make your nomination for the Refurbishment in Architecture Award

iD Town by O-office. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

The Process

During the next 3 weeks, you’ll be in charge of nominating buildings to create a fifteen projects shortlist, and then voting for 3 winners. We will guide you through these stages accordingly.

During the nominating stage, each registered user of the My ArchDaily platform will have the chance to nominate one project per day (published between January 1st 2017 and December 31st 2017). This stage starts on May 2nd and ends on May 14th at 10:00AM EST. After this, Fifteen projects will move into the voting stage, starting May 15th and ending on May 21st at 10:00AM EST. The winners will be announced on May 22nd, 2018. 

Moritzburg Museum by Nieto Sobejano. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

Eligible Projects

  • All completed buildings published between January 1st 2017 and December 31st 2017 under the Refurbishment category are eligible for this award.
  • By submitting their works to ArchDaily for publication, offices agree to enter this competition and to be present on the promotional material.
  • Authorship and copyright of each project belong to the offices and architects mentioned on each project’s page.

Moritzburg Museum by Nieto Sobejano. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

First stage: Nominations

  • Starting May 2nd, 2018, registered users will be able to nominate their favorite project. One nomination per day.
  • Nomination ends on May 14th, 2018 at 10:00AM EST.
  • The fifteen projects with the most nominations will move on to the voting round.

Shed #19 by Andrea Oliva Architetto. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

Second stage: Voting

  • On May 15th, 2018, we will update the platform with the shortlisted projects and registered users will be able to vote for their favorite project among the finalists.
  • Users can vote for one project per day.
  • The voting round will end May 21st, 2018 at 10:00AM EST.

iD Town by O-office. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

How to Nominate and Vote

  • Only registered users of the My ArchDaily platform can nominate/vote.
  • Anyone can register on the My ArchDaily platform to nominate/vote. To do so, you must follow the registration link and complete the required steps to become a registered user (or use your existing My ArchDaily account).
  • All registered users can nominate/vote once per day. After the system reboot each day at midnight (EST)
  • To register you must use a valid email address. Votes coming from users without a valid email address will be removed.
  • Offices and architects are encouraged to promote their works for voting, but no monetary or virtual gift compensation should be offered. You can use the following link:

http://boty.archdaily.com/mc/2018

Shed #19 by Andrea Oliva Architetto. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

Winners

  • 3 Winners will be announced on ArchDaily’s home page on May 22nd, 2018.
  • Each winner will receive a physical award from ArchDaily, delivered to their offices.
  • The 15 finalists and the winners can use the respective title for their own purposes. ArchDaily will provide promotional material.

Timeline

  • The nomination process starts on May 2nd and ends May 14th, 2018 at 10:00AM EST.
  • The voting round starts on May 15th and ends May 21st, 2018 at 10:00AM EST.
  • The winners will be announced on May 8th, 2018.

Moritzburg Museum by Nieto Sobejano. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

Important notes

  • All data of registered users will be kept private and will not be shared with 3rd parties.
  • After each stage, all nominations/votes will be checked. Votes submitted by fake/invalid registrations will be removed. All attempts to abuse the system, such as creating dummy accounts, suspicious behavior from individual IP addresses or any other techniques to generate nominations/votes in automated ways will be logged and reviewed for removal.
  • ArchDaily reserves the right to analyze the data during every stage of the Awards in order to ensure a fair process.
  • All questions should be sent to David Basulto, director of the awards, through our contact form.

iD Town by O-office. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Kategorien: Architektur
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